COVID-19 Press Releases

Twenty-one New Cases of COVID-19

As of today, April 11, Nova Scotia has 428 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty-one new cases were identified Friday, April 10.

“Easter and Passover are traditionally times of celebration, love and family get-togethers. But this year is going to look a little bit different,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Please don’t have family dinners or get-togethers. Stay home and reach out to loved ones by phone or video chat or whatever is best. There will be other long weekends. There will be other times to see family and friends. But if we do not follow public health protocols, we reduce the chances of having those gatherings sooner.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 885 Nova Scotia tests on Friday, April 10 and is operating 24-hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has also expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health, has a message for all Nova Scotia children during this difficult and confusing time for them.

“I want to remind Nova Scotians that not only is the Easter Bunny an essential service provider, he is an expert in physical distancing and has been practicing good paw-washing since he was just a young bunny,” said Dr. Strang. “If we continue to work together, we can follow the public health measures, stay safe and still have fun.”

To date, Nova Scotia has 13,632 negative test results, 428 positive COVID-19 test results and two deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Eight individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Ninety-five individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data.

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus.

Thirty-four New Cases of COVID-19

As of today, April 10, Nova Scotia has 407 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Thirty-four new cases were identified Thursday, April 9.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 915 Nova Scotia tests on Thursday, April 9 and is operating 24-hours.

“We have removed travel from the screening criteria for COVID-19 and increased our lab capacity so that we’re now processing close to a thousand tests every day,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “That means we are finding more cases, including those with mild symptoms. I want to thank our lab and all the staff who are working around the clock to catch cases of COVID-19 and helping to keep all Nova Scotians safe from this disease.”

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has also expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

“I want to stress to all Nova Scotians, remain vigilant, follow the public health measures, practice good hygiene, stay home as much as possible, and monitor your health,” said Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health. “If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, don’t delay. Please go to the 811 website to see if you should call 811 for further assessment.”

To date, Nova Scotia has 13,014 negative test results, 407 positive COVID-19 test results and two deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Eight individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Ninety-three individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data.

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus.

Nova Scotia Reports Second Death, 31 New Cases of COVID-19

Nova Scotia has recorded its second death related to COVID-19. On Wednesday, April 8, a woman in her 90s with underlying medical conditions died in the Cape Breton Regional Hospital as a result of complications related to COVID-19.

“The death of a loved one is never easy. Unfortunately, this virus makes the loss of a family member all the more difficult,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “I want to offer my sincere condolences to the family as they grieve. Together, we have the power to stop this disease.”

As of today, April 9, Nova Scotia has 373 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Thirty-one new cases were identified Wednesday, April 8.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 980 Nova Scotia tests on Wednesday, April 8 and is operating 24-hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has also expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 12,177 negative test results, 373 positive COVID-19 test results and two deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Eighty-two individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data.

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus.

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast, @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Thirty-two New Cases of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia

As of today, April 8, Nova Scotia has 342 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Thirty-two new cases were identified Tuesday, April 7.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed more than 700 Nova Scotia tests on Tuesday, April 7 and is now operating 24 hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has also expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

  • fever
  • new or worsening cough
  • sore throat
  • runny nose
  • headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 11,346 negative test results, 342 positive COVID-19 test results and one death. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, five of those in ICU. Seventy-seven individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data.

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus.

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast, @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Seventeen New Cases of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia

As of today, April 7, Nova Scotia has 310 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Seventeen new cases were identified Monday, April 6.

As reported earlier today, the province has also recorded its first death.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed more than 530 Nova Scotia tests on Monday, April 6 and is now operating 24-hours.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why we have removed travel as a requirement for testing for COVID-19. Visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for assessment. Anyone referred to an assessment site by 811 will be tested.

To date, Nova Scotia has 10,621 negative test results, 310 positive COVID-19 test results and one death. Confirmed cases range in age from under ten to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital. Sixty-six individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Today's update will be livestreamed at 3 p.m. on https://novascotia.ca/stayinformed/webcast , @nsgov Facebook and YouTube channels.

Nova Scotia Reports First COVID-19 Death

Nova Scotia has recorded its first death related to COVID-19. On April 6, a woman in her 70s with underlying medical conditions died in hospital in the Eastern Zone as a result of complications related to COVID-19.

“I had hoped this day would never come and I’m deeply saddened that a Nova Scotia family is going through this,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “My deepest condolences go to the family and friends who are grieving today.”

“This virus is dangerous. We have to work to slow it down to protect ourselves, those we love and everyone in our communities so that no other family has to suffer a loss like this.”

Updated COVID-19 case numbers will be shared later today, April 7, at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data.

As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better. If they are concerned about COVID-19, they can go to https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine whether they should call 811 for further assessment.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus.