COVID-19 Press Releases

Twenty-seven New Cases of COVID-19

As of today, April 27, Nova Scotia has 900 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty-seven new cases were identified Sunday, April 26.

“We will get through this extraordinarily difficult time by pulling together and supporting each another,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Please continue to reach out to your loved ones, be there for those who are grieving or having a difficult time and know that we will come through this.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 645 Nova Scotia tests on April 26 and is operating 24-hours.

“Aggressive and accessible testing remains a critical part of Nova Scotia’s fight against COVID-19. We need to identify and treat as many cases as we can,” said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health. “If you have two of these symptoms – fever, new or worsening cough, sore throat, runny nose or headache – please visit the 811 website. If you do not have internet access then please call 811.”

As of April 26, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 198 residents and 95 staff.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

fever
new or worsening cough
sore throat
runny nose
headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 26,231 negative test results, 900 positive COVID-19 test results and 24 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Twelve individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Five-hundred and nine individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

 

Nova Scotia Reports Two More Deaths, Eight New Cases of COVID-19

Today, April 26, Nova Scotia is reporting two additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 24. The deaths occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality.

“Every time a family loses a loved one to this virus, the pain is new. Two more families must say goodbye and not being able to gather with friends and neighbours to mourn together only makes it harder. Your entire province grieves with you,” said Premier Stephen McNeil.

As of today, Nova Scotia has 873 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Eight new cases were identified Saturday, April 25.

“We continue to see the devastating impact this virus can have. Please stay strong and stay the course,” said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health. “You can and should enjoy the outdoors this weekend, but please do it safely. Stay in your yard, walk around your neighbhourhood and keep your distance from others.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 673 Nova Scotia tests on April 25 and is operating 24-hours. Nova Scotia has conducted more COVID-19 tests per capita than any other province.

As of April 25, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 197 residents and 95 staff. While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

fever
new or worsening cough
sore throat
runny nose
headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 25,615 negative test results, 873 positive COVID-19 test results and 24 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Thirteen individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Four hundred and thirty-nine individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Nova Scotia Reports Six More Deaths, Fifteen New Cases of COVID-19

Today, April 25, Nova Scotia is reporting six additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 22. Five occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality. As well, a man in his 80s with underlying medical conditions died in the Western Zone; he was not a resident of a long-term care home.

“Our province is experiencing a tremendous amount of pain right now. Our thoughts are with everyone who has lost a loved one from this virus,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “We stand together to grieve those who have died and to support those who are in mourning.”

As of today, Nova Scotia has 865 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Fifteen new cases were identified Friday, April 24.

“With the weekend upon us, I ask everyone to remain vigilant. Please stay home as much as possible, wash your hands and maintain physical distance,” said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health. “Let’s be able to look back and know we did everything we could to stop this virus from hurting any more of our fellow Nova Scotians.”

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 965 Nova Scotia tests on April 24 and is operating 24-hours. Nova Scotia has conducted more COVID-19 tests per capita than any other province.

As of April 24, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 191 residents and 90 staff. While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

fever
new or worsening cough
sore throat
runny nose
headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 25,119 negative test results, 865 positive COVID-19 test results and 22 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Four hundred and twelve individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Twenty-three New Cases of COVID-19

As of today, April 24, Nova Scotia has confirmed 850 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Twenty-three new cases were identified Thursday, April 23.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 888 Nova Scotia tests on Thursday, April 23 and is operating 24-hours. Nova Scotia has conducted more COVID-19 tests per capita than any other province.

As of April 23, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 189 residents and 82 staff.

While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

fever
new or worsening cough
sore throat
runny nose
headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 24,521 negative test results, 850 positive COVID-19 test results and 16 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Eleven individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Three hundred and ninety-two individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Nova Scotia Reports Four More Deaths, Fifty-five New Cases of COVID-19

Today, April 23, Nova Scotia is reporting four additional deaths related to COVID-19, bringing the total to 16. Three occurred at the Northwood long-term care home in Halifax Regional Municipality and the other occurred at Harbourstone Enhanced Care in Sydney.

“Our hearts ache for those who have lost a loved one to COVID-19. All Nova Scotians send their support and condolences to the families and friends of those who have passed,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “The entire health-care system has rallied around Northwood and we continue to provide support and guidance to all long-term care homes to address this virus.”

As of today, Nova Scotia has confirmed 827 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Fifty-five new cases were identified Wednesday, April 22.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 921 Nova Scotia tests on Wednesday, April 22 and is operating 24-hours. Nova Scotia has conducted more COVID-19 tests per capita than any other province.

As of April 22, there were 10 licensed long-term care homes and unlicensed seniors’ facilities in Nova Scotia with cases of COVID-19, involving 158 residents and 79 staff. While most cases in Nova Scotia have been connected to travel or a known case, there is now community spread. That is why travel has been removed as a requirement for testing for COVID-19.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

fever
new or worsening cough
sore throat
runny nose
headache

To date, Nova Scotia has 23,731 negative test results, 827 positive COVID-19 test results and 16 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital, four of those in ICU. Three hundred and fifty-eight individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It is now more important than ever for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health orders and directives - practise good hygiene, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from others, limit essential gatherings to no more than five people and stay at home as much as possible.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Government to Cover Extra Dispensing Fees for Pharmacare Clients

Government will now pay extra dispensing fees for Pharmacare clients for refills on prescriptions that would usually be filled for longer periods. For example, government will cover the second and third refill dispensing fees for prescriptions typically dispensed for 90 days.

In March, the Nova Scotia College of Pharmacists recommended that pharmacists dispense prescriptions every 30 days that would usually be filled for a longer period of time. This step was taken as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic to help protect the drug supply and is similar to measures in place in other parts of the country.

“We understand some people are feeling the financial strain of additional dispensing fees,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “This will help people keep a little more money in their pockets, while protecting the drug supply to ensure Nova Scotians can get the medications they need.”

Government will also waive the $5.00 prescription co-pay for clients of the Income Assistance program and the Low Income Pharmacare for Children program.

These temporary measures take effect Thursday, April 23.

Nova Scotia has recorded 12 deaths related to COVID-19 and a total of 772 positive test results. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Ten individuals are currently in hospital, three of those in ICU. Three hundred and thirty individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

If you have two or more of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca/ to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:

fever
new or worsening cough
sore throat
runny nose
headache

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .